The Mechanics of Rejection

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Being told “No” is something every business person has to deal with when interacting with prospects.

Handling rejection

A lot of advice on handling rejection approaches the issue from a social and personal perspective and is concerned with the psychological implications.   And some of these approaches are generally relevant, but as anyone running a small business knows, rejection is a part of everyday business life. We are constantly reaching out to leads, trying to turn those leads into prospects, prospects into clients and clients into customers. We cast our nets ever wider into society and the most common response we get is some form of the word, “no”. For someone coming to the world of the entrepreneur from regular paid employment, this can be quite unnerving. 

Don’t let it stop you

Don’t take no for an answer. What this means is that not every rejection has to be final, and even if it ends up being final in that specific instance, it may lead to future opportunities. So don’t be upset that you were turned down – your message may have been incomplete. Remember, “no” is not the worst thing you can hear, it is always better than no response.

Understand their Why

Key to getting your potential client on board is to understand their need and then to manage their perception of your solution. Sometimes that match does not occur in the first instance, even though you may have done a fair job of overcoming objections. It may be that during the course of further interaction, you come to better understand their need and more accurately articulate a solution. Which is why the rejection should not be treated as the final full stop.

Getting on the same page

It is important for us to note that the rejection of our proposal is not a rejection of our personality or even of our brand. It simply represents a disconnect between the problem (as perceived by us) and the solution (as perceived by them). Reconciliation between these two positions may lie in the correction of perceptions or in the nature of the solution itself.

Maintaining bridges

People sometimes are hesitant to continue the conversation with you after they have said no to your proposal. This is particularly relevant if, in the light of new experience they have second thoughts about your proposal. It is difficult for them to walk back an earlier decision and we need to facilitate that process when the situation arises.  We must assure them that there are no hard feelings and that you are still available to them should they change their minds. So instead of expressing disappointment at not getting the business, respond in an open and friendly manner. You are also more likely to be remembered for future business.

The Magic of “Clean White” backgrounds

We have all seen them – pictures with white backgrounds. White is probably the most common color (or lack thereof) for a photo background.

 

The most obvious reason for this is that white backgrounds are the most commonly occurring for pages of text. Having the image background the same color as the printed page or screen makes integration between text and images easy. It is also a good starting point for extractions when one wants to have different background color options.

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Extracted image shown against various color backgrounds.

A white background helps the colors to “pop” without competing colors in the background.

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Sometimes the desire is just to have an image of the subject without the distraction of a bounding rectangle.

Producing an image with a “clean white” background is not the same as just shooting an image against a white background because without particular care, the “white” of the background will not match the white of the page and you will still have a bounding rectangle as can be seen from the two images below:

Particular care must be taken to light both the subject and background independently as both subject and background have different lighting requirements. A white backdrop does not guarantee that the background will come out looking white in the final image as can be seen by these images in which the subject was lit identically. The difference being that one had light on the background and the other did not:

Even a lily-white background will come out looking gray if there is not enough light hitting it. Additionally if too much light hits it, the result is “ghosting” with the light coming from behind affecting the subject:

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This may be a desirable look for some kinds of work, but where it isn’t, special care needs to be taken to ensure there is enough light to ensure the background comes out looking white, but not so much that it reflects off the background and affects the look of subject.  The intensity of the light and distance to the background must be just right. When the subject is against a white backdrop, problems can arise with backdrop texture and shadows:

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Natural (window or outdoor) light used by itself, is almost never going to satisfactorily achieve the desired (clean white) look. This kind of work will be accomplished on a consistent basis by a photographer who is competent in lighting.

For the reasons stated above this is a very useful look for both people and products in printed materials and on screen, for publication and for advertising. While it is possible to use different kinds of backgrounds and extract the subject using photo manipulation tools, this tends to be an inefficient approach and can be especially unwieldy for large numbers of images or where quick turnaround is a necessity.

Finding a Commercial Photographer for your Business

Creating a visual representation of your business is a great way to attract customers. With a wealth of options, how does one find the right fit? If you have the right skill set, you can, of course, decide to do the work yourself. Most people quickly discover that there is more to commercial photography than initially meets the eye. Some tips to keep in mind when one decides (or is considering) to hire a photographer.

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Communication

Every situation has unique features. Even when a photographer has previously worked with a business, there will still be a need to understand differences that may arise with each new assignment. That is done by asking the right questions, by listening with an open mind and by presenting options to open up the client’s mind to the possibilities that exist for what can be delivered.

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Versatility

In order to showcase a business, a variety of image types and genres may be required. A variety of subjects may need to be photographed. This will, of course, depend on the nature of the particular business – subjects vary from people to products. Whatever or whoever the subjects are, they must be shown at their best. That can be done with a deep knowledge of lighting, posing and staging.

Competence

It may be difficult for someone who is not a photographer or an art critic to properly evaluate photography. Who is going to make our people, products, and business look attractive to the public? One method is to look at the ads in high-end magazines and compare their look with the look of the photographs you are evaluating. A good photographer should:

  • be able to handle a variety of lighting situations
  • be able to direct pose and give concise directions to the subject
  • be able to work quickly and efficiently so as not to waste the client’s time

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Ultimately, this is a partnership, between the representatives of your business, and the photographer, with a common goal of providing the best images to help the business to sell their goods and/or services. Contact http://www.pixyst.com for support with developing your imaging strategy.